Employment rights act 1996

Employment rights act 1996

The Employment Rights Act 1996 outlines the rights that employees get when they work. The Employment Rights Act coincides with the Rights of Work Act 1995.

Overview of employment rights:

Employees have a set of employee rights given by parliament. These are known as statuary rights. In addition to statuary rights, employers may add additional rights to a contract of employment. An employer cannot give less rights than given in the statuary agreement. If an employer does not honour all rights outlined in the Employment Rights Act, the employee has the right to submit a claim through the employment tribunal. Compensation can vary depending on the right which has been breached. This Act does not apply to those who are self-employed nor does it apply to agency workers. Those who are self-employed usually have their rights and responsibilities set out in the terms of the contracts with their clients. The rights of agency workers are set out in the Agency Workers Regulation 2010. In 2013 the employee shareholder was introduced. An employee shareholder is similar to an employee however they have limited some of their rights in return for shares in their employer’s company. An employee shareholder has the same rights as an employee, however, they do not have the rights to claim unfair dismissal, unless the dismissal is on the grounds of discrimination, health and safety or automatically unfair. Nor does an employee shareholder have the right to claim redundancy pay.

Employment Law Resources

Constructive dismissal is term given when an employee resigns, with or without giving notice...

Garden leave or gardening leave is the practice whereby an employer will pay their employee...

Redundancy is when an employee is dismissed from employment due the employers reducing their...

The Employment Rights Act 1996 outlines the rights that employees get when they work. The...